Learn About The Social and Environmental Issues Around Coffee.


Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainable Coffee, Shade Grown, Organic Coffee, Gourmet Coffee  Flavored Coffee, Chai, Teas,
Coffee Grinders, Coffee Makers, Espresso Machines, Tea Wares...
Free Coffee With Any Purchase For A Limited Time! Save Money Ordering Directly From The Roaster!

HOME  COFFEE  :  TEA  :  SMOOTHIES  :  COFFEE MAKERS  :  COFFEE GRINDERS  :  TEAPOTS  :  FREE RECIPES  :
COFFEE & TEA ACADEMY  :  RAINFORESTS  :  FAIR TRADE  :  ABOUT US  :  PRIVACY  :  CONTACT US  :  LINKS  :

 
Java Queen International
Fair Trade Coffee and Societal News

USDA Certified Coffee  Fair Trade Certified Coffee  Bird Friendly Certified Coffee  Forbes Best of the Web



 

                     Click Here For Free Coffee Now!
 

 

Fair Trade, Organic Coffee

 




 
  As you sip your morning coffee or enjoy that afternoon espresso, do you ever think about where coffee
  comes from? Around the world, literally millions of people dedicate their lives to growing coffee.
  Unfortunately, the blessings of coffee don't always filter down to the people who grow it. Coffee farmers
  earn as little as a penny-a-pound for their harvest, and even during the years when crops do well and
  prices are high, the children of coffee growers go without much that we take for granted.

 In the last decade, coffee has made fortunes for corporations around the globe, but the profits haven’t
 trickled down to farmers. In fact, the traditional farmers of El Paraiso -- and their brethren in places like
 Kenya, Indonesia, Brazil and Zambia – are being driven out of business by low prices and corporate farms
 that produce ever higher crop yields.

 From a business standpoint, this may seem natural: Companies that market the world’s coffee are not
 charities. Like every industry, they buy their raw materials as cheaply as possible and mark them up as
 much as possible, pocketing the difference for their investors.

 But in Mexico and other coffee-producing nations, the social and environmental costs of doing business
 this way have been enormously high. The World Bank estimates that 540,000 Central American laborers
 have lost their jobs due to the current coffee crisis.

 Villages have turned into ghost towns as their inhabitants, no longer able to make ends meet, crowd into
 the dangerous and ever-expanding shantytowns that ring major cities in the developing world. Mexico City,
 one of the world's largest urban sprawls with 21 million inhabitants, is filled with such refugees.


 Large, corporate farms do increase productivity and yield. But they also consume good land at an alarming
 rate. In Brazil, huge swaths of the Amazon rainforest are burned illegally to make room for these farms. In
 Mexico, illegal timber harvesting has led to flooding and erosion that also destroys prospects for agriculture.
 Increasingly, grass-roots organizations and some governments are asking: Is there a future for small-scale
 farmers in places like Mexico? And, if not, what will the millions of peasants do for a living when their
 farms are bankrupt?

 Coffee and Community Facts

  • Coffee is the second-most traded commodity in the world economy, after oil.
  • One coffee tree yields slightly less than 1 pound of coffee per year.
  • For every pound of gourmet coffee sold, small-coffee farmers receive between 12 and 25.
  • In Guatemala, 70 children out of every 1,000 die before age 5; 51 of those children will not live to reach their first birthdays.
  • There is only 1 doctor for every 85,000 people in the Western Highlands of Guatemala.

 Java Queen International is striving to make a difference socially and environmentally while trying to build
 a viable business of our own.  We will be posting links and articles here that reflect the news in the world
 with regards to fair trade, sustainable coffee, the coffee industry and the people at all ends of the business.


Coffee And The Societal Influence Of The Business
 


Farmers


Fair Trade News

Coffee Farmers Suffer Massive Losses

Coffee Crisis

A Day In The Life Of A Coffee Grower

The True Cost of Coffee: Coffee Kids' Mission

Students Push McDonald's For Sale of Fair Trade Coffee


Lemons For Corporate Inattention
To Fair Trade

 
Laurels For Corporate Contributions
To Fair Trade

 

 

 

 


 Environmental Issues

 
Shade Grown Coffee

 



 


 
People and Coffee

International Organizations

CoffeeKids.org has helped thousands of children, women, and men in coffee-producing regions in Mexico and Central America to improve the quality of their lives and build more sustainable communities.

ChildAid: Childrens Literacy and Hearing Project providing a chance for a better life to impoverished children in Latin America.

Coffee Kids UK working with Percol Coffee to support the cause.

Fair Trademark Canada promoting fair-trade coffee


Organic Coffee Association promoting organic coffee

Responsible Coffee Campaign links & info on sustainable coffee

Songbird Foundation promoting shade-grown coffee

Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) a non-profit trade organization comprised of Retailers, Roasters, Roaster/Retail Exporters, Importers, Green Coffee Brokers, Manufacturers of Coffee Processing-Roasting-Brewing Equipment and other Allied Products.

TransFair USA promoting fair-trade coffee



   
HOME  COFFEE  :  TEA  :  SMOOTHIES  :  COFFEE MAKERS  :  COFFEE GRINDERS  :  TEAPOTS  :  FREE RECIPES  :
COFFEE & TEA ACADEMY  :  RAINFORESTS  :  FAIR TRADE  :  ABOUT US  :  PRIVACY  :  CONTACT US  :  LINKS  :
   
Copyright 2005 - 2008, Inspirational Marketing
A Division of Da Vinci Creative Consultants